Category Archives: Christmas

Christmas is coming .. in Ethiopia

Melkam Gena / Happy Christmas

Sheep are bought into Addis for sale for holidays

Sheep are bought into Addis for sale for holidays

Christmas is coming and sheep is for the pot.
Onions need cutting and enjara pan is hot.
If you can’t afford a sheep a chicken will do.
If you can’t afford a chicken then God bless you.

This adaptation tells a few home truths about festivals in Ethiopia such as Gena:
mountains of onions are peeled, chopped fine and put in the pot. Enjara bread (pancakes) is baked on the eve of Gena with a big pile ready for the feast. People using electricity in the cities are nervous of power cuts or low power meaning the pan does not

Chickens for sale on street corners

Chickens for sale on street corners

get hot enough. And after the long fast that precedes Gena, everyone wants to eat meat. Best is to buy a sheep, but prices of sheep ahead of festivals has soared in recent years. A small sheep would not cost over $100 USD, for many that is a months salary or more. But a Doro wot- spicy chicken stew – is a favourite for the holiday. Yet even a chicken would cost around $10-15USD. So there are many families who will not be able to afford a chicken this holiday.

In most of Europe and the West, Christmas is the big family day, with presents, special foods, traditions to be followed. For many they will go to church and remember that it is the celebration of the birth of Jesus, but for many more it has become a feast of consumerism and consumption.

In the Ethiopian Orthodox church, the traditional church in Ethiopia and the one that forms the framework of much of the culture of the country, there are several very important festivals throughout the year: Easter, Christmas, Timkat (the celebration of the baptism of Christ) and Meskal being the most important. Add to this new Year, which falls on 11th September in most years, and is very important to many although it is less of a religious day, and you can see that there are a good number of festivals through the year.

Bale Wold church in Addis, crowds gather to see the Tabot

Bale Wold church in Addis, crowds gather to see the Tabot on Gena/ Christmas day.

Feasting is part of all these holidays. It is also family time, with people returning to their mother’s home to enjoy real home cooking. Church is often attended during the night on the eve of the holiday, although with days like Timkat the church procession is a big part of the day’s events.

So where should you go to see Gena?  If you attend any Orthodox church the night before you will witness the service and the mass. In Addis the church of Bale Wold by Selassie celebrates

Gena ceremony in Lalibela

Gena ceremony in Lalibela, the most famous place to spend Christmas in Ethiopia.

Christmas on Christmas morning.  If you have Ethiopian friends they will undoubtably invite you round to partake in the feast. Do bring round gifts of food: coffee, biscuits, fruit, cake, bottle of wine and the like are all acceptable presents.

Gena is most famous in Lalibela. But if you have not booked it you are too late. Accommodation fills up, (so there will be no room at the inn) and flights become full.  Hotels and guides inflate their usual fees, so in addition it does become expensive.

 

 

 

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Merry Christmas / Melcam Gena

Ox stops the traffic

In downtown Addis an Ox has broken free from its new owner and is terrorising the traffic. (He chased my car after I took the photo!)

On the eve of a big holiday like Christmas, (Gena in Amharic) livestock are a common sight in the streets as animals make are lead away to become the next day’s stew.

Christmas in the Ethiopian Orthodox calendar falls on  January 7th, 13 days after western Christmas. However in Lalibela the church has ruled that it is Christmas on January 8th in a following the Ethiopian leap year.

An Ethiopian leap year has an extra day  on the last day of the year – on 11 September (as happened in 2015)  so the new year starts on Sept 12 and all dates are one day out until 29th February. The 8th January this year (2016) is the Tahsas 29 in the Ethiopian Calendar, which is the monthly festival for the birth of Christ. So in Lalibela Christmas moves in the western calendar date to stay consistent with the Ethiopian date (as with all holidays that fall from 11 Sept  – 29 Feb). But for the rest of the country the date slips back to Tahsas 28 (today) because they start counting from the date at which Gabriel announced that Mary was pregnant back in March in the previous year, and as she was pregnant for a fixed number of days … so the date is one day early every 4th year.

When ever you celebrate Christmas, we wish you a Merry Christmas and a good feast. Lets hope that Ox was not to tough!!

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